Transform Your Scholarly Publication Into A Comic!

Are you interested in translating your scholarly publication into a comic or illustration this summer?

Sequential Potential is now partnering with UC Merced the Center for the Humanities to fund the adaptation of your humanities-focused book or peer-reviewed article in a 4-page comic or 1-page illustration this summer.

If you are a faculty member interested in participating in this program, please let us know by filing this short webform by April 23, 2019: http://centerforhumanities.ucmerced.edu/form/transform-your-scholarly-publication-comic-or-illustration-0

This is a great opportunity to collaborate with renowned comic artist to promote your scholarly ideas in sequential art forms that can reach thousands and make a profound impact on your audience. For those who are following my posts, the recently published RW-94 is a great example.

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Building Contention Update

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A few years back, Christian Davenport and I began our first project together, Building Contention.

Our intent was to create some actual science riffing on Chris Ware’s groundbreaking Building Stories comic.

The goal with our project was to see if we could create a comic space that people could rearrange themselves to tell a story about their perception of protests and their effects.

We started conservatively creating 27 individual images, like the one to the left, and Chris has been working to test the “reading” of these images in a small survey to ensure that each picture does what it’s intended to do.

Here’s the data when respondents ordered a set of drawings (not shown) in terms of violence.

Here’s the data when respondents ordered a set of drawings (not shown) in terms of violence.

Here’s another set including the protestor image above and where it sits on the “Latent Violence” x-axis.

Here’s another set including the protestor image above and where it sits on the “Latent Violence” x-axis.

Even cooler….

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Here’s the color-coded patterning when the respondents ordered the comic panels in terms of what they thought happened in their home area (on the left) and what they think should happen (on the right). It’s pretty cool. Chris told me today that this actually constitutes a non-randomized pattern here, essentially confirming the effectiveness of the comic panels and the essential idea of the experiment.

If you want to see more images of the comic, please check out the full gallery, or my instagram page in the coming days. Planning to share some of my favorite panels.